Diabetic Eye Disease

Overview

Diabetes is a chronic disease in which your blood glucose or sugar levels are very high. Uncontrolled levels pose a risk to associated heart, kidney, and eye disorders. People with diabetes may develop three major eye problems – glaucoma, cataract, and retinopathy. The early symptom of all these disorders is blurred vision. High blood sugar causes swelling of the lens in the eye, distorting the ability to focus clearly. Retinopathy is the most common eye disease associated with diabetes, and is one of the leading causes of blindness in adults.

Diabetic retinopathy is a disease which damages the tiny blood vessels in the retina (the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye). Having diabetes for a long time increases the chances of developing diabetic retinopathy.

Types

There are three main types of retinopathy in diabetes, including:

Causes and complications

You chances of developing diabetic retinopathy increase with the following factors:

High levels of sugar in your blood from diabetes can cause damage to the blood vessels supplying the retina and loss of sight when the vessels become blocked and blood supply is cut off. In response, the eye grows new vessels, but these do not develop properly, and can leak and cause vision loss. Scar tissue can also form, pulling the retina and causing it to detach.

Symptoms

The early stages of the disease do not show any symptoms; but as the condition worsens you may have blurred or reduced vision with or without distortion, spots or dark shapes floating in your vision (floaters), lowered night vision, or temporary or permanent blindness.

Diagnosis

Your doctor will diagnose diabetic retinopathy using the following methods:

Diagnosis is critical, as if it is not detected and treated early, diabetic retinopathy can eventually lead to blindness.

Treatment

Treatment is decided based on the type and severity of the disease, and your response to prior treatment. Non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy may not require immediate treatment. Maintenance and control of blood sugar levels can prevent progression to more serious stages of retinopathy. However, severe cases may require surgery. The procedures include:

Treatment can slow down the progression of the disease, but is not a cure as the underlying cause, diabetes, is a lifelong condition. Regular monitoring of the condition of the eye is important and additional treatment may be required.

    Book An Appointment

    To request an appointment, please enter the information and press the "Request an Appointment" button when you are through.

    For Appointments

    Please feel welcome to contact our friendly reception staff with any general or medical enquiry call us.

    Opening Hours

    Sat – Wed 10.00 AM – 7:00 PM
    Thursday 10.00 AM – 2:00 PM
    Friday Closed